Results for

Revolution

Killing Time in a Warm Place

Jose Dalisay Jr.

1992

Killing Time in a Warm Place

Jose Dalisay Jr.

Jose Y. Dalisay Jr. is a Filipino writer who has won numerous awards and prizes for fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction and screenwriting, including 16 prestigious Palanca Awards.

Winner of the 1993 National Book Award for Fiction, Co-Winner of the 1993 Palanca Grand Prize for the Novel, and Winner of the 1993 UP President’s Award for Most Outstanding Publication. KILLING TIME IN A WARM PLACE is a novel of growing up in the Philippines during the Marcos years. Told in the voice of its protagonist, Noel Ilustre Bulaong, the narrative travels through familiar social and literary territory: the coconut groves of Bulaong’s childhood, Manila hotel, the Diliman Commune, “UG” safehouses, martial law prisons, and the homes and offices of the petty-bourgeoisie. It is a story of false horizons, of betrayal, compromise, and guilt, and not incidentally of the contemporary middle-class Filipino’s migration from the village to the metropolis to the outside world.

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Dalisay, Jr. Jose Y. Killing Time in a Warm Place. Mandaluyong City: Anvil Publishing, 1992.

Dekada ’70

Lualhati Bautista

1988

Dekada ’70

Lualhati Bautista

Lualhati Torres Bautista (December 2, 1945 – February 12, 2023) was a Filipina writer, novelist, liberal activist and political critic.

Lualhati Bautista’s Dekada ’70 follows the narrative of a middle-class family–the Bartolome family–as they live under the precarious milieu caused by President Ferdinand E. Marcos’ Martial Law. It traces the activities of the Bartolomes as they witness the radicalization of the society as seen in the growth of the underground movement and the First Quarter Storm. The novel also recounts the struggles of the family who experienced the military’s witch-hunt for activists at the height of the dictatorship which eventually wanes at the dawn of the 1986 EDSA People Power Revolution. The novel paints a vivid picture of the struggles of individual family members as they confront bitter political realities that threaten to tear them apart. It is both heartwarming and hard-hitting, often portraying how the political is personal and how the personal is political. The novel was awarded the 1983 Palanca Award Grand Prize.

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Bautista, Lualhati. Dekada ’70. Carmelo & Bauermann Printing Corp., 1988.