Results for

Protests

No Time for Crying (1986)

AsiaVisions

2022

No Time for Crying (1986)

AsiaVisions

This short documentary looks at the impoverished and violent condition of the displaced urban poor in Butuan at the tail end of the Marcos regime. The film shows that as urban poor leaders and trade unionists are slain, “salvaged”, imprisoned, and disappeared, local communities continued to organize and resist notwithstanding the risk of arrest.

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Asia Visions Productions, “No Time for Crying,” Cinemata video 29:45, May 5, 2022.

Students and drivers in First Quarter Storm protest, Manila (1970)

AP Archive

2015

Students and drivers in First Quarter Storm protest, Manila (1970)

AP Archive

Students and jeepney drivers join together in a citywide strike organized by Movement for a Democratic Philippines (MDP). In this clip, demonstrators are heard chanting “sumama na kayo (come join us)!”; later, a black cardboard coffin labeled “demokrasya” (democracy) is thrown to the ground. Upon reaching the US embassy, the marchers were barred by the police from entering the establishment.

The “People’s March,” which began in Welcome Rotonda, Quezon City, and went on to Plaza Lawton, Manila, is part of a wave of student-led demonstrations from January to March 1970, now known as the First Quarter Storm. “Fascism has always been in our country ever since the puppets of American imperialism started this republican farce that we now call Philippine democratic government,” said MDP spokesperson Nelson Navarro in an interview. “Marcos has aggravated it by the use of special forces. Marcos is trying to create an armed forces of his own within the armed forces itself.”

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AP Archive,“SYND 5 3 70 Students and Taxi Drivers Demonstrate in Manila,” YouTube video, 1:18, July 24, 2015

Papal Visit protest at Liwasang Bonifacio, Manila (1981)

AP Archive

2015

Papal Visit protest at Liwasang Bonifacio, Manila (1981)

AP Archive

On 17 January 1981, via Proclamation No. 2045, President Ferdinand Marcos officially lifted martial law. This was widely seen as an effort to create a positive image for his administration in time for the papal visit in the following month, and to placate growing opposition within the Catholic church.

Four days before the Pope’s arrival, the People’s Assembly for the Pope’s Arrival (Papa), an alliance of 32 anti-Marcos groups, gathered at the Liwasang Bonifacio in Manila to decry American imperialism and the dictatorial rule of Ferdinand Marcos. In this clip we see seminarians at the frontlines carrying a large wooden cross, which police forces pushed back and eventually destroyed in their attempts to halt the procession.

In his first homily during his six-day stay, the Pope, without mentioning Marcos’ name, condemned the use of violence to maintain peace and order. The New York Times reports: “‘Even in exceptional situations that may at times arise, one can never justify any violation of the fundamental dignity of the human person or of the basic rights that safeguard this dignity,’ the Pope declared as Mr. Marcos sat stolidly on one of the thronelike gilt chairs on the stage. ‘Legitimate concern for the security of a nation, as demanded by the common good, could lead to the temptation of subjugating to the state the human being and his or her dignity and rights.’”

However, in a separate discussion with religious orders at the Manila Cathedral, Pope John Paul II also cautioned against social involvement: “You are priests and religious. You are not social or political leaders or officials of a temporal power. Let us not be under the illusion that we are serving the gospel if we dilute our charisma through an exaggerated interest in the wide field of temporal problems.”

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AP Archive, “Demonstration Against the Repressive Policies of President Ferdinand Marcos,” YouTube video, 1:46, July 28, 2015,

Manila street scenes under martial law (1972)

AP Archive

2015

Manila street scenes under martial law (1972)

AP Archive

This clip is marked “General street scenes in Manila during martial law.” At first glance, life in Quiapo and its environs seems deceptively normal five days after the declaration of PD 1081. If one observes more closely, however, burgeoning discontent is manifest. Walls are slathered with words like “Digmaang bayan – sagot sa martial law (People’s war – antidote to martial law)” and “Itaguyod ang kalayaang Pilipino (Stand for Filipino freedom),” painted in fiery red. A week before this clip was filmed, various organizations had gathered at nearby Plaza Miranda to protest the looming imposition of martial law.

The streets’ seeming peace reveals an undercurrent of repression when a police officer, armed with a rifle and a pair of scissors, starts snipping at the locks of a long-haired youth. “We were taught to fear the police and the military,” recalls historian Ambeth Ocampo. “They punished curfew violators and jaywalkers with exposure to the sun or doing an unreasonable number of pushups. In the early days of martial law they rounded up young men with long hair and shaved their heads.”

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AP Archive, “SYND 28-9-72 Martial Law,” YouTube Video, 0:55, July 22, 2015

Bamboo in the Wind

Azucena Grajo Uranza

1990

Bamboo in the Wind

Azucena Grajo Uranza

Azucena Grajo Uranza was a Filipino novelist, short story writer, and playwright. Her novel, Bamboo in the Wind, is set during the Martial law period.

Larry Esteva, coming home from studies in Boston, witnesses at the airport a riotous demonstration that is forcibly dispersed by the military. The end of his journey turns out to be the beginning of an odyssey in his beloved city where he finds “an insidious lawlessness creeping upon the land.”

Set in Manila in the last beleaguered months before the politico-military takeover in 1972, Bamboo in the Wind tells of the last desperate efforts of a people fighting to stave off disaster. Amid the escalating madness of a regime gone berserk, an odd assortment of people—a senator, a young nationalist, a dispossessed farmer, a radical activist, a convent school girl, a Jesuit scholastic—make their way along the labyrinthine corridors of greed and power. Each is forced to examine his own commitment in the face of brutality and evil, as the book conjures up scene after scene of devastation: the massacre of the demonstrators, the demolition of Sapang Bato, the murder of the sugar plantation workers, the burning of the Laguardia rice fields. And, as a climax to the mounting violence, that final September day—the arrests, the torture, and finally, the darkness that overtakes the land.[Wikipedia]

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Uranza, Azucena Grajo. Bamboo in the Wind. Vera-Reyes, Inc., 1990.

The Arrogance of Power (1983)

AsiaVisions

2022

The Arrogance of Power (1983)

AsiaVisions

The 38-minute “film essay” by AsiaVisions (formerly Creative Audio-Visual Specialists or CAVS) spotlights the continuation of human rights abuses even after the Marcos administration had supposedly lifted Martial Law in 1981, taking the stories of clerical actors, activists, social workers, and truth-tellers to form a picture of Marcos’ cruel grip on power. Extensive militarization was Marcos’ weapon of choice, along with the imperialistic force of the United States, as seen in the presence of American bases.

“I would have no hesitation in saying that the situation has gone from bad to worse,” says Sr. Mariani Dimaranan, chair of Task Force Detainees of the Philippines, in the film. “During Martial Law years, we were focusing our attention only on three phenomena, namely: arrest and detention, salvaging, and disappearances. After the so-called lifting of Martial Law, all these phenomena stayed on or kept going, plus the fact that we had still to attend to massacres, salvaging, hamletting, and other things going on in the provinces, specifically.”

Aside from interviews, the film features archival and news footage alongside mass demonstrations of the time, including the funeral cortege of slain senator Ninoy Aquino. It documents the mounting resistance and foreshadows the ouster of Marcos via EDSA three years later. A speech by former senator Lorenzo Tañada closes the film: “Babawiin na ang mga karapatang kinuha, ang dangal na dinusta ng mga palalo at berdugo ng lahi (we will retrieve our rights that were taken away, our honor that was trampled upon by the wicked butchers of our people).”

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AsiaVisions, “The Arrogance of Power,” Cinemata video, 38:27, May 7, 2022

Living and Dying: In Memory of 11 Ateneo de Manila Martial Law Activists

Cristina Jayme Montiel

2007

Living and Dying: In Memory of 11 Ateneo de Manila Martial Law Activists

Cristina Jayme Montiel

Living and Dying: In Memory of 11 Ateneo de Manila Martial Law Activists is a book that narrates the lived experiences of 11 young Ateneans namely, Ferdie Arceo, Bill Begg, Jun Celestial, Sonny Hizon, Edjop Jopson, Eman Lacaba, Dante Perez, Ditto Sarmiento, Lazzie Silva, Nick Solana, and Manny Yap, in the context of the Martial Law years. The book serves as a memorial for these young activists, emphasizing their deeds and sacrifices in the struggle against the dictatorship.

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Montiel, Cristina Jayme. Living and Dying: In Memory of 11 Ateneo de Manila Martial Law Activists. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2007.

Marcos Against the Church: Economic Development and Political Repression in the Philippines

Robert L. Youngblood

1990

Marcos Against the Church: Economic Development and Political Repression in the Philippines

Robert L. Youngblood

The book presents an overview of state repression of the religious opposition to Marcos. It provides helpful information of the work undertaken by religious activists as well as the breadth of political detention during the Marcos period.

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Youngblood, Robert L. Marcos Against the Church: Economic Development and Political Repression in the Philippines. Ithaca: Cornell University Press, 1990.

In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People

Eva-Lotta Hedman

2005

In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People

Eva-Lotta Hedman

Based on extensive research spanning the course of a decade (1991-2001), this study offers a powerful analysis of Philippine politics and society inspired by the writings of Antonio Gramsci. It draws on a rich collection of sources from archives, interviews, newspapers, and participant-observation. It identifies a cycle of recurring “crisis of authority,” involving mounting threats – from above and below – to oligarchical democracy in the Philippines. Tracing the trajectory of a Gramscian “dominant bloc” of social forces, Hedman shows how each such crisis in the Philippines promotes a countermobilization by the “intellectuals” of the dominant bloc: the capitalist class, the Catholic Church, and the U.S. government.

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Hedman, Eva-Lotta E. In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People. Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 2005.

A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP)

Rene Ciria Cruz, Cindy Domingo, and Bruce Occena

2017

A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP)

Rene Ciria Cruz, Cindy Domingo, and Bruce Occena

A collection of brief memoirs written by members of the Katipunan ng mga Demokratikong Pilipino (KDP or Union of Democratic Filipinos). Former activists share a range of stories about their experiences organizing against the Marcos government as well as important lessons that they learned from their political work.

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Cruz, Rene Ciria, Cindy Domingo, and Bruce Occena, eds. A Time to Rise: Collective Memoirs of the Union of Democratic Filipinos (KDP). Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2017.

Mr. and Ms. Special Edition: The Aquino Funeral, September 2, 1983

Various authors

1983

Mr. and Ms. Special Edition: The Aquino Funeral, September 2, 1983

Various authors

This Special Edition of Mr. and Ms. magazine shows the bloodied body of Benigno “Ninoy” Aquino, Jr. who was murdered in August 21, 1983. The issue also contains pictures of the thousands of people who attended his public funeral. Magazines such as this one were instrumental in exposing the excesses of the regime of President Marcos. The funeral was seen as the beginning of the end of his regime.

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The Aquino Funeral (Special Edition), Mr.&Ms. magazine, September 2, 1983.

Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage: The First Quarter Storm and Other Related Events

Jose Lacaba

1986

Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage: The First Quarter Storm and Other Related Events

Jose Lacaba

A compilation of gripping on-the-spot reports on the First Quarter Storm first published in the Philippine Free Press and the Asia-Philippines Leader, Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage was a pioneering example of the New Journalism emerging in the country in the 1970s. “Of our journalists, one of the most able in the new style is Jose F. Lacaba. As TV and newsreel do, he puts you right on the scene… [H]e communicates the emotion, even the meaning of what’s happening without having to spell it out.” – Quijano de Manila

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Lacaba, Jose. Days of Disquiet, Nights of Rage: The First Quarter Storm and Other Related Events. Asphodel Books, 1986.