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Literature

The Jupiter Effect

Katrina Tuvera

2006

The Jupiter Effect

Katrina Tuvera

Based in the Philippines, Katrina Tuvera has authored a collection of short fiction, Testament and Other Stories (Anvil, 2002), and a novel set in the Philippines during the martial law years, The Jupiter Effect (Anvil, 2006), which both received the National Book Award by the Manila Critics Circle. This novel is the story of Kiko and Gaby, two martial-law babies who underwent political initiation during the Marcos years. The novel poses questions about the Filipinos’ complicity in the Marcos dictatorship and portrays many compromises that are still present in the current Philippine politics.

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Tuvera, Katrina. The Jupiter Effect. Mandaluyong City: Anvil Publishing, 2006.

Empire of Memory

Eric Gamalinda

1992

Empire of Memory

Eric Gamalinda

“Eric Gamalinda is a multi-awarded author, poet, fiction writer, playwright, and experimental filmmaker. His novel, Empire of Memory, is set in the Marcos-period focusing on two individuals who have been recently tasked to write/rewrite Philippine history. Their journey and the “stories within the story” draw numerous parallels to Marcos-era propaganda and history-writing as well as the challenges of historical memory.”

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Gamalinda, Eric. The Empire of Memory. Manila. Anvil Press, 1992.

Bamboo in the Wind

Azucena Grajo Uranza

1990

Bamboo in the Wind

Azucena Grajo Uranza

Azucena Grajo Uranza was a Filipino novelist, short story writer, and playwright. Her novel, Bamboo in the Wind, is set during the Martial law period.

Larry Esteva, coming home from studies in Boston, witnesses at the airport a riotous demonstration that is forcibly dispersed by the military. The end of his journey turns out to be the beginning of an odyssey in his beloved city where he finds “an insidious lawlessness creeping upon the land.”

Set in Manila in the last beleaguered months before the politico-military takeover in 1972, Bamboo in the Wind tells of the last desperate efforts of a people fighting to stave off disaster. Amid the escalating madness of a regime gone berserk, an odd assortment of people—a senator, a young nationalist, a dispossessed farmer, a radical activist, a convent school girl, a Jesuit scholastic—make their way along the labyrinthine corridors of greed and power. Each is forced to examine his own commitment in the face of brutality and evil, as the book conjures up scene after scene of devastation: the massacre of the demonstrators, the demolition of Sapang Bato, the murder of the sugar plantation workers, the burning of the Laguardia rice fields. And, as a climax to the mounting violence, that final September day—the arrests, the torture, and finally, the darkness that overtakes the land.[Wikipedia]

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Uranza, Azucena Grajo. Bamboo in the Wind. Vera-Reyes, Inc., 1990.

Dogeaters

Jessica Hagedorn

1990

Dogeaters

Jessica Hagedorn

Based in the US, Jessica Hagedorn is a multi-awarded Filipino-American playwright, writer, poet, and multimedia performance artist.

Dogeaters is one of her most famous novels published in 1990 which was also adapted into a play by the same name. Dogeaters, set in the late 1950s in Manila (the capital of the Philippines), addresses several social, political and cultural issues present in the Philippines during the 1950s. The destinies of a varied group of characters–movie stars, department store clerks, the wealthiest man in the Philippines–are intertwined with a beauty pageant, a film festival, and an assassination, in an incisive study of the Philippines under Marcos.

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Hagedorn, Jessica Dogeaters. New York: Pantheon Books, 1990.

Desaparesidos

Lualhati Bautista

2012

Desaparesidos

Lualhati Bautista

Lualhati Torres Bautista (December 2, 1945 – February 12, 2023) was a Filipina writer, novelist, liberal activist and political critic. Bautista garnered several Palanca Awards (1980, 1983, and 1984) for her novels ‘GAPÔ, Dekada ’70 and Bata, Bata… Pa’no Ka Ginawa?, which exposed injustices and chronicled women’s activism during the Marcos era.

Desaparesidos tells a vivid narrative of the life of political activists and the persecution they have experienced/endured during the dictatorship of President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Bautista weaves a heartbreaking story of the disappeared (desaparesidos)-the people who were taken by the authorities physically or those who could not forget the memories of torture and persecution under martial rule.

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Bautista, Lualhati. Desaparesidos. Mandaluyong City: Cacho Publishing House, Inc., 2012.

Mga Tula at Tilamsik ng Diwa

Francisco "Soc" Rodrigo

1985

Mga Tula at Tilamsik ng Diwa

Francisco "Soc" Rodrigo

This book is mainly a collection of various poems authored by Francisco “Soc” Rodrigo – a critic and political detainee of the Martial Law Regime. Writing his first original poem while in detention in 1972, his succeeding literary works were deemed subversive. Persons holding copies of these – including Rodrigo – were put in prison. The book presents the author’s writings according to various subjects such as religion, nationhood, Love, Democracy, Dictatorship, the Military, Freedom, Politics and the Voting Ballot, History, and Morality.

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Rodrigo, Francisco “Soc” (1985). “Mga Tula at Tilamsik ng Diwa.” Quezon City.

Tutubi, Tutubi, ‘Wag Kang Magpahuli Sa Mamang Salbahe

Jun Cruz Reyes

1987

Tutubi, Tutubi, ‘Wag Kang Magpahuli Sa Mamang Salbahe

Jun Cruz Reyes

Jun Cruz Reyes is a Filipino literary writer and Professor of Literature at the University of the Philippines. Writing mainly in Filipino, he is also an award-winning author of novels, short stories, essays, translations and biographies as well as a multimedia artist.

Winner of the Palanca grand prize in 1982, the novel “Tutubi, Tutubi, ‘Wag Kang Magpahuli Sa Mamang Salbahe” is an attempt of the author to narrate the first days of Martial law at “a time when one cannot directly say what’s in his or her mind.” This comes from his experiment to use satire in order to say what cannot be said without fear or in a way that will brings out humor in difficult situations.

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Reyes, Jun Cruz. Tutubi, Tutubi, ‘Wag Kang Magpahuli Sa Mamang Salbahe. Quezon City: New Day Publishers, 1987.

Killing Time in a Warm Place

Jose Dalisay Jr.

1992

Killing Time in a Warm Place

Jose Dalisay Jr.

Jose Y. Dalisay Jr. is a Filipino writer who has won numerous awards and prizes for fiction, poetry, drama, non-fiction and screenwriting, including 16 prestigious Palanca Awards.

Winner of the 1993 National Book Award for Fiction, Co-Winner of the 1993 Palanca Grand Prize for the Novel, and Winner of the 1993 UP President’s Award for Most Outstanding Publication. KILLING TIME IN A WARM PLACE is a novel of growing up in the Philippines during the Marcos years. Told in the voice of its protagonist, Noel Ilustre Bulaong, the narrative travels through familiar social and literary territory: the coconut groves of Bulaong’s childhood, Manila hotel, the Diliman Commune, “UG” safehouses, martial law prisons, and the homes and offices of the petty-bourgeoisie. It is a story of false horizons, of betrayal, compromise, and guilt, and not incidentally of the contemporary middle-class Filipino’s migration from the village to the metropolis to the outside world.

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Dalisay, Jr. Jose Y. Killing Time in a Warm Place. Mandaluyong City: Anvil Publishing, 1992.

Gun Dealers’ Daughter

Gina Apostol

2013

Gun Dealers’ Daughter

Gina Apostol

Gina Apostol is a writer, author, novelist, educator, activist. She won two Philippine National Book Awards: for her very first book Bibliolepsy and then the The Revolution According to Raymundo Mata.

Her novel Gun Dealers’ Daughter (2013) revisits the Philippines during the period of Martial Law. Winner of the PEN/Open Book Award, the book tells the story of the young, bookish Soledad Soliman who falls in with her radical friends from a university in Manila, defying her wealthy parents and their society crowd. Drawn in by two romantic young rebels, Sol initiates a conspiracy that quickly spirals out of control. Years later, far from her homeland, Sol reconstructs her fractured memories, writing a confession she hopes will be her salvation. Illuminating the dramatic history of the Marcos-era Philippines, this story of youthful passion is a tour de force.

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Apostol, Gina. Gun Dealers’ Daughter. New York: W. W. Norton & Company (reprint edition), 2013.

Narrating the Dictator(ship): Social Memory, Marcos, and Ilokano Literature after the 1986 Revolution

Roderick Galam

2008

Narrating the Dictator(ship): Social Memory, Marcos, and Ilokano Literature after the 1986 Revolution

Roderick Galam

This article inquires into the social memory of Ferdinand Marcos and of his dictatorship in the literature written in the language of his home region, Ilocos, in the period since his downfall during the 1986 People Power Revolution. The novels Saksi ti Kaunggan (1986-1987) by Juan S. P. Hidalgo Jr. and Dagiti Bin-i ti Kimat (1995) by Clesencio B. Rambaud are used as indicators of changing narrative social memories of Marcos in Ilokano literature. Hidalgo’s novel exemplifies the Ilokano writers’ ‘loyalist’ memory of Marcos, whereas Rambaud’s novel indexes attempts to reassess Marcos and the legacies of his dictatorship. This article seeks to contribute to the literature on the social memory of Marcos’s military regime; looks into the braiding of literature, memory, and the nation; and examines the constitution of memory in gender.–Galam

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Galam, Roderick, Narrating the Dictator(ship): Social Memory, Marcos, and Ilokano Literature after the 1986 Revolution, Philippine Studies vol. 56, no. 2 (2008): 151–182.