Results for

Human Rights/Human Rights Violation

Victory at Last? (1994)

Probe Archives

2022

Victory at Last? (1994)

Probe Archives

Eight years since the ouster of Marcos, the Probe looks into the entanglements of issues on jurisdiction regarding the punitive damages claimed by human rights victims during Martial Law.

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Probe Archives, “Victor at Last?” Vimeo, 15:12, May 6, 2022.

No Time for Crying (1986)

AsiaVisions

2022

No Time for Crying (1986)

AsiaVisions

This short documentary looks at the impoverished and violent condition of the displaced urban poor in Butuan at the tail end of the Marcos regime. The film shows that as urban poor leaders and trade unionists are slain, “salvaged”, imprisoned, and disappeared, local communities continued to organize and resist notwithstanding the risk of arrest.

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Asia Visions Productions, “No Time for Crying,” Cinemata video 29:45, May 5, 2022.

Third Eye: To Sing Our Own Song (1983)

BBC TV

2018

Third Eye: To Sing Our Own Song (1983)

BBC TV

This BBC documentary produced in 1983, narrated by Filipino lawyer and known Marcos opposition figure, Jose Diokno, is a comprehensive and real time account of the Marcos years. The documentary exposes the farcical economic development, corruption and the human rights violation committed by the Marcos regime. The documentary also shows the persistent resistance of the people despite the repressive state.

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BBC, “Third Eye: To Sing Own Song,” Youtube video, 14:17, October 17, 2018

Karapatang Pantao, Paano na?

Malu Maniquis, Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (Production)

2023

Karapatang Pantao, Paano na?

Malu Maniquis, Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (Production)

This 21 minute film features the Museums of both the Task Force Detainees of the Philippines and the Bantayog ng Mga Bayani Foundation, while connecting the relevance of Universal Human Rights to the subject of authoritarian repression under the Martial Law Administration. Thru this backdrop, the documentary also connects issues of the past with present circumstances – laying-out critiques towards the Duterte Administration’s War on Drugs and the use of the Anti-Terror Bill, and pointing-out problems of agrarian impoverishment and labor marginalization. Speaking in the documentary are representatives of the TFDP and Bantayog organizations, as well as survivors and victims of the Marcos and Duterte administrations.

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Maniquis, Malu (2023). “Karapatang Pantao, Paano na?” Task Force Detainees of the Philippines. 2023.

Our Voices, Our Stories, Our Redemption (2015)

Commission on Human Rights. Published on Youtube by Mila D. Aguilar

2015

Our Voices, Our Stories, Our Redemption (2015)

Commission on Human Rights. Published on Youtube by Mila D. Aguilar

The documentary was produced as part of a Martial Law Oral History Project of the Philippines’ Commission on Human Rights and Human Rights Victims’ Claims Board (HRVCB) in cooperation with the Swiss Embassy. It features various accounts of survivors and victims’ relatives who faced cases of human rights violations, including torture, arbitrary arrests and the killing or enforced disappearances of loved ones under the dictatorship. The video copy available online was republished by the late Mila D. Aguilar.

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Commission on Human Rights (2015). “Our Voices, Our Stories, Our Redemption.” Youtube video, 37:26, 14 June 2015.

Young Voters Meeting Martial Law Survivors (CARMMA Video)

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law

2016

Young Voters Meeting Martial Law Survivors (CARMMA Video)

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law

On May 2016, the group “Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law” (CARMMA) published a short video on social media days before voting commenced. Various students and young voters are shown meeting face-to-face with victims of detention and torture under the government of Ferdinand Marcos Sr., the father of then Vice Presidential Candidate Ferdinand Marcos Jr. Noting that the full education of the regime has been lacking in schools, the video ends with a call for a petition to the Department of Education to bolster textbook content on the period.

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Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law (CARMMA). 2016. “These young voters are in for a surprise.” Facebook, May 3, 2016.

Martial Law: declared on Sept. 23, 1972 – not Sept. 21 (CARMMA Video)

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law

2016

Martial Law: declared on Sept. 23, 1972 – not Sept. 21 (CARMMA Video)

Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law

“Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law” (CARMMA) published a 3 and a half minute video for facebook which begins by showing the television broadcast for Proclamation 1081 taking place at 7pm, September 23. It proceeds to show brief excerpts of various survivors of the regime detailing their experiences during the period. The survivors give parting advice to the audience – and the video ends with a petition call towards the Department of Education to integrate the teaching of the Martial Law Period more concisely in textbooks.

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Campaign Against the Return of the Marcoses and Martial Law (CARMMA). 2016. “Martial Law: declared on Sept. 23, 1972 – not Sept. 21.” Facebook, September 23, 2016.

Desaparesidos

Lualhati Bautista

2012

Desaparesidos

Lualhati Bautista

Lualhati Torres Bautista (December 2, 1945 – February 12, 2023) was a Filipina writer, novelist, liberal activist and political critic. Bautista garnered several Palanca Awards (1980, 1983, and 1984) for her novels ‘GAPÔ, Dekada ’70 and Bata, Bata… Pa’no Ka Ginawa?, which exposed injustices and chronicled women’s activism during the Marcos era.

Desaparesidos tells a vivid narrative of the life of political activists and the persecution they have experienced/endured during the dictatorship of President Ferdinand E. Marcos. Bautista weaves a heartbreaking story of the disappeared (desaparesidos)-the people who were taken by the authorities physically or those who could not forget the memories of torture and persecution under martial rule.

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Bautista, Lualhati. Desaparesidos. Mandaluyong City: Cacho Publishing House, Inc., 2012.

The Arrogance of Power (1983)

AsiaVisions

2022

The Arrogance of Power (1983)

AsiaVisions

The 38-minute “film essay” by AsiaVisions (formerly Creative Audio-Visual Specialists or CAVS) spotlights the continuation of human rights abuses even after the Marcos administration had supposedly lifted Martial Law in 1981, taking the stories of clerical actors, activists, social workers, and truth-tellers to form a picture of Marcos’ cruel grip on power. Extensive militarization was Marcos’ weapon of choice, along with the imperialistic force of the United States, as seen in the presence of American bases.

“I would have no hesitation in saying that the situation has gone from bad to worse,” says Sr. Mariani Dimaranan, chair of Task Force Detainees of the Philippines, in the film. “During Martial Law years, we were focusing our attention only on three phenomena, namely: arrest and detention, salvaging, and disappearances. After the so-called lifting of Martial Law, all these phenomena stayed on or kept going, plus the fact that we had still to attend to massacres, salvaging, hamletting, and other things going on in the provinces, specifically.”

Aside from interviews, the film features archival and news footage alongside mass demonstrations of the time, including the funeral cortege of slain senator Ninoy Aquino. It documents the mounting resistance and foreshadows the ouster of Marcos via EDSA three years later. A speech by former senator Lorenzo Tañada closes the film: “Babawiin na ang mga karapatang kinuha, ang dangal na dinusta ng mga palalo at berdugo ng lahi (we will retrieve our rights that were taken away, our honor that was trampled upon by the wicked butchers of our people).”

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AsiaVisions, “The Arrogance of Power,” Cinemata video, 38:27, May 7, 2022

So Why Samar? (2015)

Commission on Human Rights

2016

So Why Samar? (2015)

Commission on Human Rights

This documentary contains interviews of Samar residents narrating, in great detail, their harrowing experiences of torture, sexual abuse, rape, forced labor, murder, and mutilation at the hands of the Philippine Constabulary and soldiers. The documentary also tried to explain why Samar had such strong military presence. It all boiled down to the interest of the Marcos’ cronies in the logging and mineral resources of the island.

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Commission on Human Rights, “So Why Samar?” YouTube video, 27:33, May 6, 2016.

Signos (1983)

Mike de Leon, Jose F. Lacaba, Sylvia Mayuga, Ricardo Lee, Ding Achacoso, Joe Cuaresma, Lito Tiongson, Jovy Zarate

2018

Signos (1983)

Mike de Leon, Jose F. Lacaba, Sylvia Mayuga, Ricardo Lee, Ding Achacoso, Joe Cuaresma, Lito Tiongson, Jovy Zarate

In this documentary, journalists, human rights lawyers, activists, labor leaders, and artists emphasize the work, the risks, and the hardships that came with challenging the Marcos dictatorship. They discuss issues of red-baiting and repression that led to the suffering and deaths of those who fought for democracy in the Philippines. “Ang batas ay hindi masyadong masama (the law is not that bad),” says former senator Jose W. Diokno in the film. “Ang masama ay ang pagka-intindi ng mga militar at pulis sa kahulugan ng batas (what’s bad is the interpretation of the military and police on the spirit of the law).”

The film begins with interviews of people visiting Ninoy Aquino’s wake at the Santo Domingo Church in Quezon City. It then moves to the experience of people representing various sectors: Sr. Christine Tan of Justice for Aquino, Justice for All; Joe Burgos, publisher of the independent newspaper Malaya; journalists Armando Malay and Ceres Doyo; former senator Jose W. Diokno; Letty Magsanoc, former editor of Philippine Panorama; Rene Saguisag, MABINI lawyer; Lino Brocka of Concerned Artists of the Philippines; Loretta Rosales of Alliance of Concerned Teachers; Ka Felicing Villados, labor leader; Popsing Malonzo of Kilusang Mayo Uno; Dr Sylvia de la Paz of the Medical Action Group; Elmer Mercado of League of Filipino Students; Sr Mariani Dimaranan of Tasks Force Detainees of the Philippines; Jaime Cardinal Sin, archbishop of Manila; and Ramon del Rosario, Jr, businessman.

Notable is the representation of mainstream celebrities and filmmakers who rose against censorship and human rights violations. The Manila Film Center and the Manila International Film Festival are visible in the background of protests and interviews. Director Marilou Diaz-Abaya, Anita Linda, Johnny Delgado, Bembol Roco, Mitch Valdez, and Gina Alajar are seen speaking out in a mass demonstration against the Board of Review for Motion Pictures and Television headed by Maria Kalaw Katigbak.

The film itself is collectively made–the hierarchy of credits flattened–by artists who by this time were already quite renowned in the cinema scene, including director Mike de Leon, writers Jose F. Lacaba and Ricky Lee, and musician Ding Achacoso. “It was no accident that this documentary heavily influenced my depiction of the major characters of Sister Stella L.,” said de Leon, referring to the film starring Vilma Santos that he directed under Regal Films the following year. “Sister Christine and Ka Felicing became my templates for the characters of the two Sister Stellas and the union leader Ka Dencio.”

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Mike de Leon, Jose F. Lacaba, Sylvia Mayuga, Ricardo Lee, Ding Achacoso, Joe Cuaresma, Lito Tiongson, Jovy Zarate, “Signos,” Vimeo video, uploaded by Citizen Jake, 38:33, December 4, 2018
https://vimeo.com/304516355.
https://vimeo.com/696054524?login=true

Marcos Martial Law: Never Again

Raissa Robles

2016

Marcos Martial Law: Never Again

Raissa Robles

Marcos Martial Law: Never Again is a book by Raissa Robles, a veteran journalist, who comprehensively details the culture of corruption, impunity, and brutality of President Ferdinand E. Marcos’ dictatorship. Robles’ work can be appreciated as a history of torture in the Philippines, with particular focus on the apparent and “deliberate policy” of torture implemented by the Marcos regime. Moreover, Robles paints a vivid picture of torture by citing the actual experiences of Martial Law survivors who endured various torture methods employed by the military.

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Robles, Raissa. Marcos Martial Law: Never Again. Filipinos for a Better Philippines, Inc, 2016.