Results for

Democracy

The Marcos Era: A Reader

Leia Castañeda Anastacio and Patricio N. Abinales (eds.)

2022

The Marcos Era: A Reader

Leia Castañeda Anastacio and Patricio N. Abinales (eds.)

The Marcos Era: A Reader is an appraisal of various aspects of Ferdinand E. Marcos’ regime–its key personalities, policies, and programs. Written by historians, political scientists, social scientists, economists, lawyers, journalists, and other members of the civil society, the Martial Law reader aims to contribute to ongoing academic conversation about the Marcos regime that lasted for more than two decades and shaped Philippine contemporary history.

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Anastacio, Leia Castañeda and Patricio N. Abinales (eds.). The Marcos Era: A Reader. Quezon City: Ateneo de Manila University Press, 2022.

Dead Aim: How Marcos Ambushed Philippine Democracy

Conrado De Quiros

1997

Dead Aim: How Marcos Ambushed Philippine Democracy

Conrado De Quiros

A collection of insightful essays by one of the leading journalists of the Philippines, most of which appeared in the Philippine Daily Inquirer which show the various means by which Ferdinand Marcos, Sr. ambushed Philippine democracy to dominate Philippine politics.

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De Quiros, Conrado. Dead Aim: How Marcos Ambushed Philippine Democracy. Foundation for Worldwide People’s Power, 1997.

In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People

Eva-Lotta Hedman

2005

In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People

Eva-Lotta Hedman

Based on extensive research spanning the course of a decade (1991-2001), this study offers a powerful analysis of Philippine politics and society inspired by the writings of Antonio Gramsci. It draws on a rich collection of sources from archives, interviews, newspapers, and participant-observation. It identifies a cycle of recurring “crisis of authority,” involving mounting threats – from above and below – to oligarchical democracy in the Philippines. Tracing the trajectory of a Gramscian “dominant bloc” of social forces, Hedman shows how each such crisis in the Philippines promotes a countermobilization by the “intellectuals” of the dominant bloc: the capitalist class, the Catholic Church, and the U.S. government.

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Hedman, Eva-Lotta E. In the Name of Civil Society: From Free Election Movements to People. Hawaii: University of Hawaii Press, 2005.

The Situation in the Philippines [1984]

U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

1984

The Situation in the Philippines [1984]

U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations

This comprehensive report was based on two visits of several members of the US Senate Committee on Foreign Relations between May and July of 1984 in order to assess the situation in the Philippines. Key observations were made particularly on the conduct of the elections for the National Assembly, the current political climate, the ongoing insurgency, and the assassination of Benigno Aquino Jr.

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U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations Staff. The Situation in the Philippines. Washington D.C.: U.S. Government Printing Office, 1984.

“Democracy, Philippine Style,” Philippines Free Press

Philippine Free Press News Team

1971

“Democracy, Philippine Style,” Philippines Free Press

Philippine Free Press News Team

This special issue of the Philippine Free Press, dated September 4, 1971, contains an in-depth treatment, including color photographs, of the bombing at Plaza Miranda, during a political rally in Manila, which occurred on August 21, 1971. The bombing caused nine deaths and injured 95 others, including many prominent Liberal Party politicians, considered as President Marcos’s strongest opposition party. This bombing became one of the main reasons for the declaration of Martial Law used by President Marcos himself to remain in power.

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“Democracy, Philippine Style,” Philippines Free Press, September 4, 1971.

The Decline of Democracy in the Philippines

G.E. Bisson, William Butler, and John Humphrey

1977

The Decline of Democracy in the Philippines

G.E. Bisson, William Butler, and John Humphrey

This 1977 report by the International Commission of Jurists contains the findings done by the three missions done from May 1975 to February 1977. The commission concludes that the proclamation and implementation of Martial Law were not justifiable and had largely served to protect the interest of President Ferdinand Marcos. They assessed that the continued extension and justification of this measure led to the decline of Philippine democracy.

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Bisson, G.E., Butler, William, and John Humphrey. The Decline of Democracy in the Philippines. The International Commission of Jurists, 1977.

Testament From A Prison Cell

Benigno S. Aquino

1984

Testament From A Prison Cell

Benigno S. Aquino

This brief but moving testament of one man’s convictions–a man self-described as “a humanist, a democrat and a romantic”–was written in a prison cell by one of the first political opponents to be arrested and held in military detention after Marcos established his totalitarian regime in the Philippines on September 22, 1972. Five years after his arrest, Aquino was sentenced to death by firing squad. What is presented here is Aquino’s elegant, reasoned defense of his political views (Christian Socialist), his outline for an ideal society (freedom of the individual is all-important), and a family history of patriotism (both his father and grandfather were “imprisoned for serving the Filipino people”). Bleeding through the text’s rationale and legalese is a current of unabashed passion from a man who believed in his cause.

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Aquino, Benigno S. Testament from a Prison Cell. Makati, Metro Manila, Philippines: [Benigno S. Aquino, Jr. Foundation], 1984.