Organizations

This section includes materials collected by various governmental and non-governmental organizations during and after the extended period of Martial Law in the Philippines. These organizations played a vital role in documenting, gathering and preserving medico-legal records, descriptive and analytical reports, newspaper clippings, posters and other pertinent artifacts depicting the scale of human rights violations during this period. Included in this valuable collection are personal narratives and interviews of people and groups who had experienced military detention and torture first-hand.

Some organizations (such as the Medical Action Group) have entrusted key documents to the Library. Once they are fully digitized, they will be uploaded here. For materials belonging to organizations (such as the Memorial Commission, Commission on Human Rights and Task Force Detainees of the Philippines) that are already preserved in their respective websites, hyperlinks will be provided below for easier access.

Amnesty International (AI) – Philippines

Amnesty International (AI) – Philippines

Amnesty International’s early years in the Philippines were made possible by international solidarity, youth involvement and human rights education.

During the tail-end of Martial Law, a group of human rights activists came together to form what would become the Philippine section of Amnesty International (AI). In 1984, Al Senturias, a leading light at AI-Philippines, was invited by AI-London to speak about human rights in the Philippines. His passionate intervention prompted the International Secretariat to conduct research on the country that same year. AI-Philippines was officially registered in 1987, one year after the fall of the Marcos regime.

Of particular importance are AI International’s MIssion Reports during Martial Law in the Philippines:
https://www.amnesty.org.ph/1982/09/amnesty-international-mission-reports-during-martial-law-in-the-philippines/

Survivor testimonies: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AXBbStkfNV4

On generational trauma: https://www.facebook.com/amnestyph/videos/478734897528367

Additional Successes
AI-Philippines successfully campaigned for the enactment, ratification and adoption of the following:

Local laws
Anti-Violence Against Women and their Children Act (2004)
Repeal of the Death Penalty Law (2006)
Juvenile Justice Act (2006), Magna Carta on Women (2009)
Anti-Torture Act (2009)
Respect for IHL Act (2010)
Responsible Parenthood Act (Reproductive Health Law, 2012)
Anti-Disappearance Act (2012)
Human Rights Victims Reparation and Recognition Act (2013)

International human rights treaties and agreements
UN Convention Against Enforced Disappearances (2010)
UN International Arms Trade Treaty (2013)
UN Moratorium on the Use of Capital Punishment (2007)
Optional Protocol to the Convention on the Rights of the Child on the Use of Children as Soldiers (2003)
Second Optional Protocol on the International Convention on Civil and Political Rights Aiming for the Abolition of the Death Penalty (2007)
Rome Statute on the International Criminal Court (2011)
Optional Protocol on the Convention Against Torture (2012)

AI is currently pushing for legislation that seeks to protect human rights defenders, establish a system to prevent torture and ill treatment in all places of detention, strengthen the witness protection program and prevent acts of discrimination against the marginalized and the vulnerable. In 2019, their combined efforts with various individuals, organizations and like-minded states prompted the UN Human Rights Council to adopt a resolution giving it the mandate to examine thousands of alleged extra-judicial executions linked to the Philippine government’s war against drugs.

Contact:
Butch Olano, Head of Office
Amnesty International Philippines
18-A Marunong, Diliman, Quezon City,
1100 Manila, Philippines

section@amnesty.org.ph

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Bantayog ng mga Bayani Foundation

Bantayog ng mga Bayani Foundation

The Bantayog ng mga Bayani (Monument of Heroes) is dedicated to those who lived and died resisting the Martial Law regime. The foundation maintains a memorial site, museum and archive of materials pertaining to the struggles of Martial Law victims who are now recognized as heroes.

Dr. Ruben Mallari, a Filipino-American doctor, helped establish the memorial site to honor the sacrifices of people who had died for the cause of freedom. In raising awareness about the collective struggle against the Marcos dictatorship, the Bantayog hopes to reach scholars, students and school children alike.
As of January 2024, 298 of 326 persons recognized by the Bantayog Research Center as heroes and martyrs possess biographies that are digitally available for browsing through their website’s “Martyrs and Heroes” Section.

Under the “Museum” tab, the Bantayog Foundation’s website provides a showcase of the memorial site, including artpieces, monument features, and the museum’s educational initiatives.

The “Library and Archives” section includes a short collection of books, articles and digitized primary sources, including productions by the foundation.

Finally, the “Art and Multimedia” section of the site provides a mix of resources, including creative art pieces, music recordings, historical audio files, documentary articles, and videos.


Contact Person: May V. Rodriguez (Executive Director)
Address: Sen. Jovito R. Salonga Building, Bantayog Center, Quezon Ave, Diliman, 1109 Quezon City, Philippines.

Contact Email: bantayogbayani@gmail.com

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/bantayogngmgabayani/
https://www.instagram.com/bantayogngmgabayani/
https://www.youtube.com/@bantayogngmgabayanifoundation
https://twitter.com/bantayogbayani

Phone Number: 282982298

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Commission on Human Rights (CHR)

Commission on Human Rights (CHR)

The Commission on Human Rights (CHR) is a government agency that was established in the wake of the EDSA Revolt of 1986. It was created in response to the atrocities committed under the Marcos regime, and mandated to conduct investigations of human rights violations against marginalized and vulnerable sectors of society.

Martial Law Materials Available
The CHR produced a series of short videos entitled “Habilin,” which focus on the narratives of Martial Law survivors.

With the passage of R.A. 10368, the CHR facilitated a series of oral history interviews across the country to document the state of human rights during Martial Law. Three documentary videos were produced as a result. One tackles the Malisbong Massacre (“Mga Kwento sa Malisbong”), another focuses on Human Rights Violations in Samar (“Why Samar?”), and a third video takes a broader look at human rights violations during the Marcos years (“Our Voices, Our Stories, Our Redemption”).


Contact Information
Contact Person: Atty. Richard Paat Palpal-latoc (Chairperson)
Address: SAAC Building, Commonwealth Avenue, Diliman, Quezon City, 1101

Contact Email: publicassistance@chr.gov.ph

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/chrgovph/
https://twitter.com/chrphilippines
https://www.instagram.com/chrgovph
https://www.tiktok.com/@chrgovph

Phone Number: (02) 8294-8704

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Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND)

Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND)

The Families of Victims of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND) is a nationwide mass organization of families, relatives, friends and colleagues of desaparecidos that advocates for their rights, dignity and empowerment. Founded in 1985, amidst the escalating mass protest against the Marcos dictatorship, FIND continues to struggle resolutely for the eventual eradication of enforced or involuntary disappearance all over the world. As an NGO, it retains Special Consultative Status with the Economic and Social Council of the United Nations.

FIND’s important book — “Beyond Disappearance: Chronicles of Courage” is highly regarded in the human rights community. In the words of Rep. Edcel Lagman, who wrote the book’s foreword: “The book honors the desaparecidos and those who survived the ordeals of Martial Law. It is also a constant reminder to ‘muster relentless courage in the pursuit of justice and freedom’ and a ‘potent antidote against amnesia, of forgetting the odiousness and avarice of the Marcos martial law regime.'”

Contact:

Cecille Baello, Campaign and Lobby Officer
FIND
Unit 2-C 2/F Tempus Place II,
21 Matalino St.,
Diliman, Quezon City,
Philippines
Tel: 63 2 7007 9128
email: natl.find@gmail.com

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GABRIELA

GABRIELA

The GABRIELA National Alliance of Filipino Women was founded in March 1984 after 10,000 women marched in Manila, defying a Marcos decree against demonstrations. GABRIELA was named in honor of Gabriela Silang, a Filipina revolutionary, who led a revolt against Spain in 1763 after her husband’s assassination. By challenging patriarchy and neocolonialism, the organizationn pushed for social transformation. In a context of widespread social inequality and unrest, GABRIELA continues to push for the emancipation of women on many levels.

The alliance is a nationwide network of grassroots organizations, institutions and programs that address social issues such as human rights, poverty, globalization, militarism, violence, rape culture, health, sex trafficking, censorship and other issues affecting women. It has regional chapters all over the Philippines. GABRIELA works towards the education and empowerment of women from marginalized sectors of society. It also engages in counseling services, medical missions, free clinics and training on women’s rights and women’s health.

GABRIELA has numerous publications and videos, including “Dumaloy ang Ilog Chico “(And So the Chico River Flows), a 1995 children’s book narrating the campaign to defend the Kalinga and Bontok communities from soldiers and foreign contractors planning to build the Chico River Dam in the late 70s. It documents the harrowing long-term impact of Marcos policies on indigenous Filipinos.

Contact:

Gert Ranjo-Libang, National Chairperson
or Cora Agovida, Deputy Secretary-General for External Affairs
Gabriela National Alliance of Women
35 Scout Delgado, Bgy Laging Handa,
Quezon City, Metro Manila
Tel: 632 83712302
email: Gabriela.international@gmail.com

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Human Rights Violations Victims’ Memorial Commission (HRVVMC)

Human Rights Violations Victims’ Memorial Commission (HRVVMC)

The Human Rights Violations Victims’ Memorial Commission (HRVVMC) is a government agency mandated under R.A. 10368 to establish a Memorial Museum for the victims and survivors of Martial Law under Marcos, Sr. It is also tasked with ensuring that these lessons are integrated in all levels of educational curricula.

Martial Law Materials Available
At present, the agency safeguards the documents of 11,103 reparations claims pertaining to Human Rights Violations Victims (HRVVs) between 1972-1986. The “Roll of Victims” drop-down tab at the website’s top banner gives researchers access to this list — disaggregated based on the severity of the violations suffered by each individual.

The HRVVMC also provides digital copies of its original publications under the “Projects” drop-down tab. These include the “Palimbang Massacre Reader” and a series of “Essential Truths” booklets tackling various aspects of the Martial Law years. A section titled “50 under 50” provides a selection of victims’ stories pulled from 50 of the names recognized under R.A. 10368. The “Library” section directs users to the Online Public Access Catalogue for the agency’s library collection.

e.g., The conditions of working women during the Marcos years and the question of economic abuse:
https://hrvvmemcom.gov.ph/vaw-woman_in_the_factories/?fbclid=IwAR0xuxV64AjZl2oS-NER2GXi5xt2ptjr6YDpdmsiTmAmMuIfBCX4Iiio2qM


Contact Information
Contact Person: Carmelo Victor A. Crisanto (Executive Director)
Address: 4th Floor 150 Corporate Center, Panay Ave., Brgy. South Triangle, Quezon City (open Mondays to Fridays, 9AM – 5PM).

Contact Email: records@hrvvmemcom.gov.ph

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/hrvvmemcom/

Phone Number: +632 8289 2429

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Karapatan / SELDA

Karapatan / SELDA

Samahan ng mga Ex-Detainees Laban sa Detensyon at Aresto (SELDA) is an organization of political prisoners and former political detainees that was founded in December of 1984. KARAPATAN was founded by its member organizations in 1995. It is an alliance of individuals, groups and organizations working to protect human rights in Philippines. Its members have been at the forefront of the struggle since Martial Law.

Both groups document and monitor human rights violations in the Philippines — particularly in the context of the government’s campaigns against the Communist insurgency and the National Democratic Front of the Philippines.

Martial Law Materials Available
SELDA assisted Martial Law survivors who filed for recognition under R.A. 10368. This included providing fact sheets on human rights violations during the 1980s. Both groups also handle the files of Desaparacidos, including personal records (accounts, testimonies, fact sheets and photographs), newspapers during Martial Law, letters and other materials.


Contact Information
Secretary-General: Cristina Palabay
Contact Email: publicinfo@karapatan.org; selda.phils@gmail.com

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/karapatan
https://twitter.com/karapatan

Phone Number: +63 270908183

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Medical Action Group (MAG)

Medical Action Group (MAG)

At the height of the Marcos dictatorship, a group of doctors under Dr. Mita Pardo de Tavera banded together to provide medical and legal attention to victims of political repression and their families. They also assisted Free Legal Assistance Group (FLAG) lawyers led by Sen. Jose W Diokno with the documentation of torture and other abuses. By 1982, the organization would come to be known as the Medical Action Group (MAG). Today, MAG aspires to help create a society that protects the health and human rights of Filipino citizens.

Martial Law Materials Available
MAG archived the profiles of Victims of Human Rights Violations and their medical records, along with documentation of multiple incidents made through various fact-finding missions and on-site research.


Contact Information
Contact Person: Edeliza Hernandez (Director)
Address: 20 Rd 9, Project 6, Quezon City, Metro Manila

Contact Email: mag.1982@magph.org

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/MAGPHOfficial/
https://twitter.com/medactiongroup

Phone Number: +632 8273 4609

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Project Nameless Collective

Project Nameless Collective

The Nameless Project was the brainchild of Martial Law era Activist Luisito Rogado. Since 2011, the site has framed itself as a complement to other organizations like the Bantayog ng mga Bayani, republishing the profiles of individuals listed on the Wall of Remembrance while providing an online space for communities built around the countless victims and survivors — many of whom remain nameless — of the Martial Law period.

Martial Law Materials Available
The project offers access to the Bantayog ng mga Bayani’s Heroes and Martyrs Profiles in alphabetical order. The website’s “Stories” section provides a wide mix of materials authored by contributors to the project. These range from solidarity or official statements from individuals and organizations, to open letters and messages, poetry and audio-visual files of events or media pieces.

The website’s “Stories” Section provides a wide mix of materials authored by members or contributors to the project. These range from solidarity or official statements from individuals and organizations, to open letters and messages, poetry and audio-visual files of events or media pieces.


Contact Information

Contact Email (for those interested in contributing to the site): info@nameless.org.ph

Social Media: https://www.facebook.com/NamelessHeroesProject/

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Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP)

Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP)

Task Force Detainees of the Philippines (TFDP) was established by the Association of Major Religious Superiors of the Philippines (AMRSP) in 1974. The group was tasked with documenting and assisting political prisoners during Martial Law. Beginning as a Catholic response to political detention under Marcos, Sr., its members would go on to help establish other human rights organizations, such as Families of Involuntary Disappearance (FIND), Samahan ng Ex-Detainees Laban sa Detensyon at Aresto (SELDA) (an organization of ex-political detainees), KAPATID (an organization of families of political prisoners), and Mothers and Relatives Against Tyranny and Oppression (MARTYR). During the term of President Corazon Aquino, TFDP helped build the largest human rights alliance in the country – the Philippine Alliance of Human Rights Advocates (PAHRA).

Dapat All! Conversations with advocates and survivors on human rights for all:
https://taskforcedetainees.net/category/tfdponline/dapat-all-human-rights-for-all/


Contact Information
Emmanuel Cristobal Amistad
Address: No. 45, Saint Mary Street, Bgy. E. Rodriguez, Cubao, Quezon City 1109, Philippines.

Contact Email: tfdp.1974@gmail.com

Social Media:
https://www.facebook.com/TaskForceDetainees/
https://twitter.com/TFDPupdates
https://www.tiktok.com/@tfdponline
https://www.instagram.com/tfdponline/

Phone Number: +632 8995 0246

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United Church of Christ in the Philippines (UCCP)

United Church of Christ in the Philippines (UCCP)

Established in 1948, the UCCP is an “organic union” of leading Protestant denominations in the country: the Evangelical Church of the Philippines, the Philippine Methodist Church, the Disciples of Christ, the United Evangelical Church and several independent congregations.

During the early years of Martial Law, UCCP, like other member churches of the National Council of Churches in the Philippines (including the Iglesia Filipina Independiente and the United Methodist Church) were silent in the hopes that Marcos would address the rampant lawlessness, criminality, violence and poverty throughout the country.

By 1974, however, the UCCP released a statement warning its members and the government about the dangers of abuses under Martial Law. Human rights violations during this period worsened significantly, as many church workers who expressed dissent were jailed, tortured and persecuted. By 1978, UCCP demanded the restoration of civil and political liberties and the immediate dismantling of martial rule. It was thus the first Protestant Church to have issued such a statement, which was strongly founded on the theological view “that human dignity is inherent to every person.”

In 2012, some members of the Cosmopolitan Church disaffiliated themselves from UCCP. Examples of scholarly works by some church members include:

Cirilo A. Rigos, “The Posture of the Church in the Philippines under Martial Law” (1975).
Oscar S. Suarez, “Theology of Struggle: Reflections on Praxis and Location” (1986).
Oscar S. Suarez, “Protestantism and Authoritarian Politics: The Politics of Repression and the Future of Ecumenical Witness in the Philippines” (1999).

Contact:
Bishop Melzar D. Labuntog
UCCP National Office
877 EDSA, West Triangle
Quezon City 1104
Tel: 632 8 426 1729 | 8 426 3790 | 8 426 9157
email: ogsuccp@gmail.com

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